ARTICLES

To Inspire & Inform

Stretch Out Your Hand

How God’s silence in the face of our prayers may be an invitation to draw closer

Our church’s local and global outreach ministries have always worked toward common goals to reach our city and the world with the love of Jesus. This spring, we’re bringing them together in a fresh way.

The invitation of Easter is simple. Do you really want to be happy? Do you want to know where you find real hope and purpose and significance in life? Come & see. Come and see who Jesus is, what he did for you, and how he changes everything. Whether you’ve been a Christian for years or are just starting to discover faith, the invitation is for you.

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Introducing Noah Smith this past Sunday as our new Director of Student Ministries marks the end of a nearly year-long search to fill the Calvary Students leadership position. And in many ways, we're ending where we began.

On Sunday March 3, one of our elders, Dave Kurt, announced that our restated constitution was enthusiastically adopted by congregational vote.  As a result, our new constitution became effective on March 1.  The first official action was to affirm Josh Reasoner as our lead teaching pastor, which we celebrated at our Sunday service on March 3.  One of the major changes in our new constitution is the creation of elder term limits as well as a new process for nominating and choosing new elders.  

How does God want the church to serve immigrants, refugees and strangers?  How are they part of God’s plan to spread the gospel to all nations? Throughout the Old Testament and the New, we are taught to treat the foreigner well: to extend hospitality, offer compassion, and embrace equality as we love them as ourselves (Leviticus 19:33-34). In short, we make them our neighbors.

As you know, we are toward the final stages of restating our old constitution. I am pleased to report that as of the end of the 30-day voting period, February 15th, we have received only four votes against the restated constitution.  This means that as of March 1st, 2019, the proposed restated constitution becomes official.  We will immediately begin working on the Lay Elder nomination process and term limit procedures.  You will hear more of this in the very near future.

A church is like a big family, and family members need to talk and listen to each other well in order to flourish and grow.  I plan to touch base with you here to keep our church community informed of big picture issues relating to Calvary. We had a fantastic turnout for our Family Meeting last Sunday.

As we continue learning more about spiritual disciplines, it’s important to keep in mind that regimens are different than rhythms, which are part of the flow of daily Christian living. You can read about spiritual rhythms here. This second part is geared toward helping you explore more spiritual regimens and the purpose behind them. Remember, these should be approached prayerfully and not by just “plowing into them.” Regimens are often considered practices of abstinence, meaning they use self-restraint to avoid or to get rid of something. In that sense, they often feel abrupt and difficult.

The spiritual disciplines are a key means of growth for the Christian. They're how we "get on the road" to becoming more like Jesus. Some are meant to be part of the normal rhythm of daily life. (I wrote about those here.) Others, the regimens, are meant to interrupt our daily life and invite God to something new or different in us. You can see my introduction to the regiments here

I've written about spiritual practices, both rhythms and regimens, to supplement to the Following the Masterstudy. Spiritual disciplines do not directly cause growth but rather put us in the stream of God's grace so the Spirit can do His work in our hearts to transform us. In an earlier article, I reference Dallas Willard saying, "God's address is at the end of your rope." What did Willard mean and how does this connect with the spiritual disciplines?

People fall along a diverse spectrum of spiritual maturity. You have beginners, which are both new Christians as well as those who simply haven't thrown themselves into the means of grace to help them grow. Those are the people who most need to jump into practicing basic rhythms in their life. But then you also have seasoned Christians, who have known and walked with the Lord for years and who readily practice the rhythms of the Christian life, yet may describe their spiritual growth as stagnant. There is great temptation to settle as if that's as good as it’s going to get. And this is where the regimens come in! Regimens are those spiritual practices [disciplines] that are best done in short spurts because of their intensity. 

The Apostle Paul writes in 1 Timothy 4:7, "…but train yourself to be godly. For physical training is of some value, but godliness has value for all things, holding promise for both the present life and the life to come." There is a rigorous training in the Christian life, but it's not the kind of training that focuses primarily on your will to accomplish something. For instance, one should not look at the fruit of the Spirit, or any command in the Bible to be virtuous and approach it as if they could make themselves be "that".

Find articles and resources related to the Following the Master study Calvary Life Groups are doing this spring:

In the second sermon in the Credo: Here We Stand series, “Father, Almighty, Creator,” I mentioned sexual identity as one of the cultural issues on which Christians must take a stand that is grounded in Scripture and compassionate and kind. Below is a list of resources by Christians who are studying, thinking, talking, and praying about this issue. Some of them have personal experience; all handle this subject with grace. These are resources our Calvary Church pastors recommend.

Last summer during my month-long study break in Cambridge, Kurt and Lyndse Felsman came to see me.  We were out for a walk together after a nice meal, and I turned to Kurt and said, “I’ve been thinking about preaching through the Psalms next summer. I’m going to call it God Songs; what do you think?”  He said, “It sounds like God has been doing some things in your heart.” 

In my post-election sermon on Sunday, November 20, 2016, I referenced a number of great articles and books that have helped me think about my position as a citizen of God's kingdom and a citizen in the "kingdom of man." Below I'm sharing those with you. These are all resources focused first and foremost on putting God's kingdom first so I can recommend each one to you.

I want to speak as a pastor about the presidential elections. I believe that the gospel applies to all of life, even the way we think about things like national, state, and local politics. What I have to say may surprise you. I’m not going to tell you who to vote for since for me to do so is wrongheaded for all kinds of reasons. I learned a long time ago from Billy Graham that ministers of the gospel need to stay focused on their primary calling—preaching the gospel.  So let me provide what I think is some helpful pastoral counsel for all of us during this year’s election. I want to encourage you.

Writing to the Galatians, Paul is, in his own words, “astonished that you are so quickly deserting the one who called you to live in the grace of Christ and are turning to a different gospel—which is really no gospel at all” (v 6-7). It’s not a foreign god or idol turning the hearts of these Galatian Gentiles [people who were not Jews]; it’s a bunch of Jewish teachers, who have introduced the rules and regulations of the old covenant to these new believers. They have said, in essense, You have received Jesus, that’s good! Now you need to follow these dietary laws, keep these rules, and also get a special surgery [circumcision] so you can stay right with God. They were persuasive and many of the Galatians followed along.

All around us are constant reminders that our world needs renewal. Terrorist attacks, security concerns, civil war, the refugee crisis, and a political process gone haywire. Our own lives are far from perfect either. Sickness is a reminder that the world is not as it should be. I picked up a tropical fever on a recent trip to India and Nepal. It’s pronounced deng-ee fever (Dengue Fever), but my wife and I call it the Dang Fever. My wife has been recovering from surgery and that has been a long process. My compassion for the sick and suffering has soared in recent weeks! Physical suffering is only a small part of the pain we feel though. There is all the broken stuff in our lives too. Discouragement, depression, and disappointment. The hurting of family and friends. The reminders of grief and mourning.

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